US Convoys Attacked by IEDs in Three Iraqi Locations

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The IED attacks against US convoys are part of an effort by the Iraqi resistance to rid Iraq of all US troops

On 23 January, three supply convoys all transporting logistics materials and equipment belonging to the US-backed coalition, came under attack in separate locations across Iraq.

The first of the convoys, was struck in the morning by an improvised explosive device (IED) in Al-Diwaniyah city in Al-Qadisiyyah province.

The second convoy was attacked in Samawah in Al-Muthanna province in Iraq’s south. The third convoy was attacked along the main highway in Babylon province. IEDs were used in both these attacks as well.

All three attacks were confirmed by the Sabreen Telegram channel, which is close to the Popular Mobilization Units (PMU).

The IED attack in Babylon was carried out by the Iraqi resistance movement, Ashab al-Kahf, who claimed responsibility.

In a statement released on the official Telegram channel belonging  on the evening of 23 January, Ashab al-Kahf announced that they had “conducted an operation targeting an American military convoy in the province of Babylon, at the intersection of Jableh, Jisr al-Mahaweel, precisely at 10:03 am on today’s date.”

However, the two earlier attacks have yet to be confirmed by a particular group.

The attacks were part of an effort by the Iraqi resistance to drive out US occupation forces from Iraq.

The attacks are also part of a continuous effort to avenge the assassination of PMU Commander Abu Mahdi al Muhandis with IRGC Commander Qassem Soleimani on 3 January 2020.

On 5 January 2020, the Iraqi parliament voted to end the US occupation in Iraq. In an agreement with the Iraqi government in July 2021, the US coalition consented to a withdrawal of combat missions in Iraq by the end of 2021.

However, in December 2021, the government of Iraq said some 2,500 troops would remain in the country as ‘trainers and advisers’ to the Iraqi army.

As a result, the end of 2021 and the beginning of 2022 saw an increase in IED attacks against convoys belonging to the US coalition.